When:
October 24, 2019 – October 25, 2019 all-day
2019-10-24T00:00:00+02:00
2019-10-26T00:00:00+02:00
Where:
EMPERORS PALACE CONVENTION CENTRE
64 JONES ROAD
OR TAMBO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
KEMPTON PARK
Contact:
Bussynet Advanced Trading
+27114369214
SMART CITIES CONFERENCE @ EMPERORS PALACE CONVENTION CENTRE

One thing is certain: we now live in a world that is becoming increasingly urban. It is estimated that by 2050, more than 70 percent of the world’s population will live in cities. Large urban areas are the new engines of growth in the global economy, responsible for almost 80 percent of global GDP; and with urbanisation gaining traction as it is now, it is inevitable that future cities have to find intelligent ways of delivering services to all their inhabitants.
Enter smart cities.
With urban populations currently growing disproportionately to urban infrastructure, smart cities will be better positioned to manage the rapid growth in urban population. The concept of Smart Cities is premised on urban areas adopting new technologies to deliver safer, faster, more efficient and sustainable public service into their operations. Take the city of Barcelona, for instance, where they use smart lighting to reduce energy consumption – a seemingly small innovation that has paved the way for the introduction of other technological capabilities that measure air, traffic and water quality – and even paved the way for the provision of free WIFI internet in the city.
From ubiquitous infrastructure connectivity and drones to autonomous vehicles, smart cities are less about creating new technologies than adopting existing capabilities and integrating them into coordinated city operations for sustainable efficiency. According to Sandra Wu Wen-Hsiu, Chairperson and CEO of Kokusai Kogyo, a Japanese company, most of these solutions are not new at all. The technology is already there; the art is in how can cities tap into these innovations and bring them together to provide advanced city running models that will take clients and citizens into the future.
Public health is one area where small investments in technology can bring big benefits to marginalized groups. In the developing world, preventable illnesses comprise a disproportionate share of the disease burden. When data are used to identify demographic groups with elevated risk profiles, low-cost mobile-messaging campaigns can transmit vital prevention information. So-called “m-health” interventions on issues like vaccinations, safe sex, and pre- and post-natal care have been shown to improve health outcomes and lower health-care costs. And public safety too – earthquake alerts, etc. According to forthcoming research by the McKinsey Global Institute, smart-governance solutions in urban areas can improve health, safety, environmental, and other quality-of-life metrics by between 10 and 30 percent. And, as the research discovered, cities at the upper end of that range are often the poorest. To realize this potential, however, poor cities must first overcome a more basic problem: gaps in digital infrastructure.
But as digital systems become more pervasive, there is a danger that inequality will deepen unless local governments recognize that tech-driven solutions are as important to the poor as they are to the affluent. The prevailing challenges of smart cities will be in balancing open data and data security, and ensuring inclusivity, especially of poor and ageing populations who tend to be less tech-savvy. Here, the creation of local social-media networks could help seniors stay connected, perhaps by drawing them into mentoring and tutoring programs that build cross-generational bonds. E-career platforms could also be coded to match retirees with opportunities outside of the home. And more cities could deliver telemedicine and video consultations to elderly residents who are unable to easily travel to see doctors.
These are some of the issues that will be discussed at the Smart Cities Conference, which will be held on the 24th and 25th of October 2019, at the Emperors Palace Convention Centre in Johannesburg. Speakers will share insights on what cities in the developing world need to do to stay abreast with other modern cities in the world.

 

SPEAKERS 

Simon BROMFIELD
Territory Manager
Roger BLEWETT
Senior Solutions Executive
Carl STROUD
CEO
Mo Areff
Business Unit Lead; Customer Engagement
Sashwin PILLAI
Founder
Dr George GERBER
Associate Director
Bilal KATHRADA
CEO
Lebo LESHABANE
CEO
Peter PEDRICK
Director
Joanie TARR
Project Manager

Areas of Discussion
• Automation, Robotics & Control
• Computational Biology & Medicine
• Cyber-Physical Systems
• Data Analytics
• Energy Systems
• Information Sciences
• Networks
• Smart Cities
• Smart Lighting ERC

Target Audiences
• Cities
• Municipal Manager
• Policy-makers
• Start-ups and innovators
• Researchers
• Vice President
• Director
• General Manager
• Secretary General/Strategic Director
• Senior Manager
• Mayor
• Alderman
• Commercial Manager
• Sales Manager
• Account manager
• Business Development Manager
• Senior Marketer
• Communication Manager
• Project Manager
• Programme Manager
• Government Departments
• Public Sector Undertakings
• Urban Planners
• Infrastructure Engineering Companies
• Infrastructure Consultants
• Funding Agencies
• Project Executing Agencies
• Academic & Research Bodies
• IT Solutions Providers
• Smart Technology Experts
• Utilities
• Telecommunication companies
• Transport and logistics
• Public Transport Associations
• Construction companies

3 thoughts on “SMART CITIES CONFERENCE”

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